You can access the distribution details by navigating to My pre-printed books > Distribution

Type: e-book
Genre: Biographies & Memoirs
Language: Bengali, English
Price: ₹50
Description of "Days of Glory"
In the early twentieth century the British Empire was at its zenith- the sun never set on the empire, which spread all over the globe from Australia, New Zealand to Malay, Burma and India, to Yemen, Transjordan, Egypt, Africa, Guyana and on to Canada. Birendra lost faith in endless street agitations, conferences, meetings, the boycotting of British made goods and patriotic songs. He did not think these could ever achieve Independence. Birendra wanted to hit the mighty empire directly and did so independently with his faithful brave associates. “Days of Glory” is a Memoir of Birendra Bhattacharjee who played a prominent role in the revolutionary cadres of the time in Bengal. Seeking more action and impact, he formed his own small organisation with some faithful associates and went on to strike out at the British Empire. Providence however did not grant him much time. His one act of insurrection became a prominent and celebrated case, but he was betrayed and turned over to the authorities, arrested, tortured and imprisoned. There is considerable debate about how exactly India gained its freedom. In the late 1940’s and 50’s it was taught and widely accepted that it was Gandhi who gained the independence. It was said that the British were afraid of the damage that would be caused to their reputations by the sight of non-violent Indians being willingly beaten by stick-wielding policemen in the Raj’s employment. Over time this belief has changed based on new facts and attitudes. Although this will be criticised as an unpatriotic stance, Independence did not turn out to be a matter of gaining a glorious freedom but was rather a transfer of power, leaving everything intact from the British administration and transferring the levers of power to the new rulers. This included placing Indian Governors / Rashtrapati in the Vice-regal palace. At the outset there was only an administration that was selected by the preferences of a single man Gandhi, who won the hearts of millions of Indians. He preferred a simple agrarian life, cleaning latrines and spinning cloth and viewed all industrial progress with suspicion. It all started with great enthusiasm. Mahatma Gandhi started the full independence movement in 1921 but after the violence in Chourichoura he abandoned the movement altogether. Bengal had steered its own course in the early part of the century. In 1905, it was Curzon, a staunch imperialist who undertook the division of Bengal. With the acquiescence of the Nawab of Dhaka, who was himself suspicious of the Hindu population and the prospect of a loss of power should the British leave. Curzon divided Bengal into the Muslim dominant east and the Hindu majority west. 1908 saw Arabinda and Barin Ghosh convicted in the Alipore bombing case. That was the year when Khudiram Bose was hanged for another bomb-throwing case. The Bengali youth lost confidence in Gandhi’s approach. His approach of non-violence with its attendant motivations to embarrass the British, were not making sufficient progress in their eyes. The Bengali youth wanted action. Birendra was born with the surname Bhattacharjee. His ancestors were all Gangopadhyay, but in native Bramhanbaria they took the title of Bhattacharjee. His was a lower middle-class family from an obscure village and the family income came from what little land they owned, supplemented by his father Mahendra Chandra’s salary from a Dhaka landlord’s office. The family was always financially constrained. Mahendra would disembark from the train several stops before his destination and walk up to twenty miles to save a few annas. Birendra was the great hope for the family. From a young age his intelligence, charm and charisma were remarked upon. But he left his family, his home and a comfortable professional path for a life of ideology, action, danger and ultimately arrest, torture and imprisonment. This sacrifice is impossible to understand in today’s world.
About the author(s)
Birendra was born with the surname Bhattacharjee. His ancestors were all Gangopadhyay, but in native Bramhanbaria they took the title of Bhattacharjee. His was a lower middle-class family from an obscure village and the family income came from what little land they owned, supplemented by his father Mahendra Chandra’s salary from a Dhaka landlord’s office. The family was always financially constrained. Mahendra would disembark from the train several stops before his destination and walk up to twenty miles to save a few annas. Birendra was the great hope for the family. From a young age his intelligence, charm and charisma were remarked upon. But he left his family, his home and a comfortable professional path for a life of ideology, action, danger and ultimately arrest, torture and imprisonment. This sacrifice is impossible to understand in today’s world. He played a prominent role in the revolutionary cadres of the time in Bengal but, seeking more action and impact, he formed his own small organisation with some faithful associates and went on to strike out at the British Empire. Providence however did not grant him much time. His one act of insurrection became a prominent and celebrated case, but he was betrayed and turned over to the authorities, arrested, tortured and imprisoned. More gravely still, after Independence, he and his fellows from Bengal were side-lined by the Congress party and airbrushed from the history of the Independence movement of India. Many freedom fighters died of starvation and poverty after being displaced from East Pakistan after the Bengal Partition. And it was only in the 1960s and 1970s that the government arranged the most meagre pension for those who were still alive. It amounted to little more than a few tens of rupees. In sharp contrast, the new democratic rulers of India continued to live in a style that could only be described as imperial. Accrding to Tapan Kumar Bhattacharyya, Birendra's Son - Birendra himself confessed that at the time of his activities he did not map out the likely path of the future. Tapan said, In 1975 I recall him reminiscing with a former comrade involved in the Steven’s assassination. They had been assured by the senior members of their organizations that India, once free, would provide a brighter, equitable future for all its citizens but that was clearly not the case. They wondered if it had been worth making the extreme sacrifices, they made for the status quo they now saw about them. The personal cost to them was everything they had and the societal cost, through the passage of history and political mismanagement, led to the death and displacement of millions and the continued disenfranchisement of so many. After being released from prison, he joined the Marxist party, which was then illegal and was jailed once more. After that he returned home after many years, his father now dead and his mother very old. With a sense of guilt at her despair, noting too how he had not attained the more secure future they had hoped he would give he had been at Dhaka Medical School, he promised her to follow a more conventional path and embark on a family life. But finding conventional work was not easy. I still remember how despite a grave fever, he embarked on a perilous journey to a remote hill station tea garden. He loved a challenge and it took him beyond transportation, to a place where he had to wade across the river with his luggage and papers held aloft. In the absolute darkness he finally discerned a dim light and there found, within a small hut, a man from a local tribe who took him in. Rather than be unnerved at such a journey and the remoteness, he felt remarkably at home. His sacrifices cost him dear but also impacted his family. Working in remote places and being absent from home meant that the burden of raising the family in the most challenging circumstances fell squarely on his wife, Suhashini. She had also been imprisoned by the British. She had been a teacher and left that profession to raise her family. Though he lived until 87 and worked hard into his 70s, he could never catch up commercially with the counterfactual life he had given up. His selfless attitude to his fellow workers made him a wonderful colleague but hardly a successful capitalist.
Book Details
ISBN: 9788192006314
Publisher: Sushanta Bhattacharjee
Number of Pages: 120
Availability: Available for Download (e-book)
Other Books in Biographies & Memoirs

Shop with confidence

Safe and secured checkout, payments powered by Razorpay. Pay with Credit/Debit Cards, Net Banking, Wallets, UPI or via bank account trasnfer and Cheque/DD. Payment Option FAQs.